Thoughts on CTX for surgery?

Authors

Using the CTX test as a guide to bone surgery has been controversial. What is the current thinking on the validity of this test? I have a patient with a CTX value of 66 and peri-implantitis. She needs surgical care but I don’t think that will be possible with this CTX value. Thoughts?

About CTx (from https://www.mayocliniclabs.com/): Human bone is continuously remodeled through a process of bone formation and resorption. Approximately 90% of the organic matrix of bone is type I collagen, a helical protein that is crosslinked at the N- and C-terminal ends of the molecule. During bone resorption, osteoclasts secrete a mixture of acid and neutral proteases that degrade the collagen fibrils into molecular fragments including C-terminal telopeptide (CTx). As bone ages, the alpha form of aspartic acid present in CTx converts to the beta form. Beta-CTx is released into the bloodstream during bone resorption and serves as a specific marker for the degradation of mature type I collagen. Elevated serum concentrations of beta-CTx have been reported in patients with increased bone resorption...Elevated levels of beta-C-terminal telopeptide (CTx) indicate increased bone resorption. Increased levels are associated with osteoporosis, osteopenia, Paget disease, hyperthyroidism, and hyperparathyroidism. In patients taking antiresorptive agents (bisphosphonates or hormone replacement therapy), a decrease of 25% or more from baseline beta-CTx levels (ie, prior to the start of therapy) 3 to 6 months after initiation of therapy indicates an adequate therapeutic response.